Saturday, October 29, 2011

Reformation Sunday 2011: How Would Protestants Know When to Return?

Over the past week of driving around town, I have noticed various Protestant churches advertising different ways to celebrate Reformation Sunday and the recovery of the "true gospel" after breaking from the Catholic Church. The odd thing is that the Protestants who attend these churches hold contradictory beliefs about what exactly is the "true gospel" and have continued the practice of rejecting one church and starting a new one in pursuit of each group's interpretation of the "true gospel." This thought came to me after I passed a Presbyterian, a Lutheran, and a Baptist church all on the same block, and all with signs mentioning Reformation Sunday. To remain consistent, shouldn't these Protestants celebrate each subsequent split since the Reformation that finally led to the recovery of the "true gospel" now taught at their current church? Obviously, some churches may have more celebrations than others.

Anyway, here is an article over at Called to Communion by Bryan Cross about Reformation Sunday.

Reformation Sunday 2011: How Would Protestants Know When to Return?

Here is another article that is a must read this weekend:

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Heresy Gets Things Done

John Zmirak has written a great article about orthodoxy and heresy:

Q. So you admit that, when it comes to the Trinity and the nature of Christ, the Church has spent centuries tussling over a tangle of logical contradictions, in search of a plausible story?

If only it had; then maybe we’d have one. My life would be a lot easier, and this book would only need to be a pamphlet. Like modern physicists who wrangle with the equally persuasive but mutually irreconcilable claims of relativity and quantum mechanics, the Church was presented with evidence that was devilishly difficult to understand all at once, much less to reconcile. Our theologians used the best tool at hand, Greek philosophy, to tease out the real-world implications of what God had told us about Himself, to figure out how we should pray, and to whom. If what we had been trying to craft was a cogent fable, we certainly would have lopped off one manageable piece of that enormous, intractable elephant and held it up as the whole: “Behold the trunk of God!”

Read the rest here: Heresy Gets Things Done

Monday, October 17, 2011

Shameless Popery: St. Ignatius of Antioch and the Eucharist

Shameless Popery: St. Ignatius of Antioch and the Eucharist: Today's the feast day of St. Ignatius of Antioch, one of my favorite Early Church Fathers. He was a student of the Apostle John, and served...

Protestant Objections to the Catholic Doctrines of Original Justice and Original Sin



"What objections have various Protestant theologians raised to the Catholic doctrines of original justice and original sin, and what is the Catholic reply to these objections? Here I (Bryan Cross) present some Protestant arguments against the Catholic doctrines of original justice and original sin, from Martin Luther, John Calvin, Francis Turretin, Charles Hodge, Gordon Clark, and Peter Leithart, along with a Catholic reply to each."


Continue reading: Protestant Objections to the Catholic Doctrines of Original Justice and Original Sin

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Church Fathers.org Quote of the Week: Intercession of the Saints







The Intercession of the Saints

"Atticus, sleep in peace, secure in your safety, and pray anxiously for our sins" (funerary inscription near St. Sabina’s in Rome [A.D. 300]). "Pray for your parents, Matronata Matrona. She lived one year, fifty-two days" (ibid.). "Mother of God, [listen to] my petitions; do not disregard us in adversity, but rescue us from danger" (Rylands Papyrus 3 [A.D. 350])